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Tigers species:

Endangered (Around 3900 remain) Panthera tigris

Affected by: Illegal wildlife trade , Human wildlife conflict , Habitat loss and fragmentation

The gorgeous, awe-inspiring tiger is one of our planet’s most iconic animals. But here’s the shocking truth. Wild tiger numbers dropped by more than 95% in the past century. But, for the first time in conservation history, their numbers are on the increase.

We aim to help double the number of wild tigers to over 6,000 by 2022 – the next Chinese year of the tiger.

In recent years, conservation work and the commitment of various governments has halted the decline in global tiger numbers. But there’s a lot more work to do.

We’re working closely with governments and community groups across Asia – and your support is crucial, as always. Will you join us and help protect this amazing wild cat?

Where tigers live

Tigers used to roam across most of Asia, but now they’re restricted to just 7% of their original range, in isolated forests and grasslands across 13 countries.

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Why tigers are so important

As top predators, tigers help to keep their environment healthy.

It’s the way things naturally work in the wild – the predators prey on other animals, in this case herbivores (plant-eaters) such as deer. But without enough tigers to eat them, herbivores can overgraze and damage the land, disrupting the balance of the local environment. 

Local people also depend on a healthy environment for food, water and lots of other resources. By helping protect tigers we’re also helping look after the places where they live, which is good for all the people and wildlife sharing that environment.