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07 June 2017

Renewables 2017: Global Status Report - WWF Comment

Commenting on the publication of the Renewables 2017: Global Status Report by REN21 which shows that there was a additions in installed renewable power capacity set new records in 2016, with 161 gigawatts (GW) installed, increasing total global capacity by almost 9% over 2015, to nearly 2,017 GW, Gareth Redmond-King, Head of Energy and Climate at WWF said:

“Renewables are transforming our energy use – in the UK, and around the world. With nearly four fifths of the UK public supporting renewables, there really is no good reason for the next UK Government not to back continued deployment of what are rapidly becoming the cheapest forms of electricity generation. 100% renewable electricity is no longer a pipedream, but a very real possibility which we are moving closer and closer towards. It is good for our economy and great for our environment.

“We’ve achieved a huge amount in the UK through our deployment of renewables – slashing our emissions by more than a third since 1990. What we need now is for the next UK Government to prioritise their long-overdue plan to reduce emissions into the next decade. This will not only help maintain the UK as a leader on tackling climate change, but also continue the growth in jobs and investment which the clean energy sector brings.”

Notes to editors

  • 25% of electricity generation came from renewable sources in 2015
  • In 2016 UK coal use fell to its lowest rate since 1894
  • UK wind power generated more power than coal in 2016
  • 2016 saw the United Kingdom add 56 MW of offshore wind capacity capacity.
  • At the end of 2015 the UK had the third largest amount (units and capacity) of small scale turbines in use.
  • In 2016 the UK was in the top 5 national investors in renewables by economy.
  • Within Europe, the United Kingdom was the largest national investor in renewable energy for the second consecutive year, at USD 24 billion.
  • The UK was also one of the top three biggest contributors to small scale distributed capacity in Europe.