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Asian elephants species:

Critically endangered (Around 2800 remain) Elephas maximus sumatranus

Affected by: Habitat loss and fragmentation , Illegal wildlife trade , Human wildlife conflict

Endangered (Around 31000 remain) Elephas maximus indicus

Affected by: Habitat loss and fragmentation , Illegal wildlife trade , Human wildlife conflict

Endangered (Around 4000 remain) Elephas maximus maximus

Affected by: Habitat loss and fragmentation , Illegal wildlife trade , Human wildlife conflict

Asian elephants once roamed across most of Asia, now they’re restricted to just 15% of their original range, in a number of fragmented and isolated populations around south and south-east Asia.

Asian elephants are not quite as big as their African cousins, and have proportionally smaller ears. They’re generally dark grey to brown but often have pink or yellow marks on their face, ears and trunk.

Female Asian elephants are more social than males. They live in herds with their female relatives. Males usually live alone but sometimes form small groups with other males.

Living in some of the most densely populated parts of the world has brought challenges – Asian elephant numbers have roughly halved in the last three elephant generations. We need your help to make them thrive again.

Asian elephants stomping ground

More than half of all wild Asian elephants are found in India, with around 10,000 in the north-east of the country. Some move across the border between India and Nepal.

There may be fewer than 100 wild elephants in Vietnam, perhaps 250 in Cambodia, and under 250 left in China.

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Why Asian elephants are so important

Elephants are very important grazers and browsers, eating vast amounts of vegetation every day, spreading seeds around as they go. They also help shape the often-thick vegetation of the Asian landscape.

For example in forests, elephants create clearings and gaps in the trees that let sunlight in to reach new seedlings, helping plants grow and the forest to regenerate naturally. Forests provide important resources for both wildlife and people.

Elephants will also dig for water when there isn't any surface water – opening water access for other creatures as well as themselves.

By protecting the Asian elephant, we’re making sure they and their environment stay healthy and thriving.

Adopt an elephant

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£25 could pay a Protection Unit ranger's salary for 10 days, to help keep these magestic creatures safe.

Adopt Kiruba – she’s the leader of her group of Asian elephants, so she’s relied on to find food, water and a safe environment for her herd.

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